| Home. | Universe Galaxies And Stars Archives. | 
Universe Galaxies Stars logo.
     | Universe | Big Bang | Galaxies | Stars | Solar System | Planets | Hubble Telescope | NASA | Search Engine |

Astronomical objects exist in space.


Ten Years Since The Revolution at Amazon.

SAS Black Ops at Amazon.
Amazon Kindle EBook Reader: Click For More Information.

Astronomical objects are significant physical entities. Astronomical objects are associations or structures which current science has confirmed to exist in space. This does not necessarily mean that more current science will not disprove their existence. Some astronomical objects, such as Themis and Neith are, in light of more recent findings, considered not to exist at all. Other astronomical objects like Pluto and Ceres, prove to be of an entirely different nature than first expected.

Astronomical objects.
Astronomical objects are space objects.

In these cases, the scientific community must come to a consensus as to the new status of these objects. Obviously, not all scientists will agree; this gives birth to fringe science. However, fringe science is not always bad science. Some of our most fundamental scientific theories, such as the superstring theory and plate tectonics, were once considered fringe. Even in the mainstream community, new ideas are constantly changing the way we view the universe at large. Astronomical objects thought to exist based on scientific evidence are considered hypothetical.

Astronomical objects can be easily confused with "astronomical bodies." The term "body" indicates a simple object, such as a planet. These terms differ from "celestial objects" and "celestial bodies" only in that the latter terms do not include the Earth. The table below lists the general categories of objects by their location or structure.

Solar SystemExtrasolar objects
Simple objectsCompound objectsExtended objects
  • Sun.
  • planetary system
    • planets .
    • dwarf planets .
    • asteroids
      • "Vulcanoids".
      • "Apoheles".
      • Near-Earth asteroids
        • "Arjunas".
        • Atens.
        • Apollos.
        • Amors.
        .
      • Mars-crossers.
      • asteroid belt
        • Hungarias.
        • Phocaeas.
        • Nysas.
        • Alindas.
        • Hildas.
        • Pallas.
        • Marias.
        • Koronis.
        • Eos.
        • Themis.
        • Griquas.
        • Cybeles.
        • Thule.
        .
      • Trojan asteroids
        • Mars trojans.
        • Jupiter trojans.
        • Neptune trojans.
        .
      • Outer planet crossers.
      • Damocloids.
      • Centaurs.
      .
    • Trans-Neptunian objects
      • Kuiper belt .
      • Scattered Disk Objects
        • Sedna.
        .
      .
    • comets.
    • Oort cloud.
    • Meteoroids
      • meteors.
      • Meteor showers.
      .
    .
  • Exoplanets
    • Hot Jupiters.
    • Eccentric Jupiters.
    • Pulsar planets.
    • Hot Neptunes / Super-Earths.
    • Transiting planets.
    • Rogue / Interstellar planets.
    • Hypothetical planet types
      • Chthonian planets.
      • Oceanic planets.
      • Trojan planets.
      .
    .
  • Brown dwarfs
    • Lithium dwarfs.
    • Methane dwarfs.
    • Sub-brown dwarfs.
    .
  • stars by spectral type
    • Blue stars.
    • Blue-white stars.
    • White stars.
    • Yellow-white stars.
    • Yellow stars.
    • Orange stars.
    • Red stars.
    • Peculiar stars
      • Carbon stars
        • C-type stars.
        • S-type stars.
        .
      • Shell stars.
      • Wolf-Rayet stars.
      • Peculiar A-type stars.
      • Metallic A-type stars.
      • Barium stars.
      • P Cygni stars.
      • Blue stragglers.
      .
    .
  • stars by luminosity class
    • Subdwarf stars.
    • Dwarf (main sequence) stars.
    • Subgiant stars.
    • Giant stars.
    • Bright giant stars.
    • Supergiant stars.
    • Hypergiant stars.
    .
  • stars by population
    • Population III stars.
    • Population II stars
      • Halo stars.
      • Thick disk stars.
      .
    • Population I stars.
    .
  • stars by stellar evolution .
  • Variable stars
    • Intrinsic variables
      • Pulsating variables
        • Cepheid variables.
        • W Virginis variables.
        • Delta Scuti variables.
        • RR Lyrae variables.
        • Mira variables.
        • Semiregular variables.
        • Irregular variables.
        • Beta Cephei variables.
        • Alpha Cygni variables.
        • RV Tauri variables.
        .
      • Eruptive variables
        • Flare stars.
        • T Tauri variables.
        • FU Orionis variables.
        • R Coronae Borealis variables.
        • Luminous blue variables.
        .
      • Cataclysmic variables
        • Symbiotic variables.
        • Dwarf novae.
        • Novae.
        • supernovae
          • Type I supernovae.
          • Type II supernovae.
          .
        • Hypothetical
          • Collapsars or Hypernovae.
          .
        .
      .
    • Extrinsic variables
      • Rotating variables
        • Alpha2 CVn stars.
        • Rotating ellipsoidal variables.
        .
      • Eclipsing binaries
        • Algol stars.
        • Beta Lyrae stars.
        • W Ursae Majoris stars.
        .
      .
    .
  • Compact stars
    • white dwarfs
      • Black dwarfs.
      .
    • neutron stars
      • Magnetars.
      • pulsars.
      .
    • Hypothetical stars
      • Quark stars.
      • Preon stars.
      .
    • black holes
      • Intermediate-mass black holes.
      • Supermassive black holes.
      .
    .
  • Gamma ray bursts.
  • planetary systems.
  • Star systems
    • Single star systems
      • Solar System.
      .
    • Multiple star systems
      • Binary stars
        • Optical binaries.
        • Visual binaries.
        • Astrometric binaries.
        • Spectroscopic binaries.
        • Eclipsing binaries.
        • Close binaries
          • Detached binaries.
          • Semidetached binaries.
          • Contact binaries.
          • Unresolved binaries.
          .
        • X-ray bursters.
        .
      • Triple star systems.
      .
    .
  • Stellar groupings
    • Star clusters
      • Stellar associations.
      • Open clusters.
      • globular clusters.
      .
    • Constellations.
    • Asterisms.
    .
  • Galaxy components
    • Galactic bulges
      • Galactic bars.
      .
    • Galactic rings.
    • Spiral arms.
    • Thin disks.
    • Thick disks.
    • Galactic halos.
    • Galactic coronae.
    .
  • galaxies
    • galaxies by morphology
      • Spiral galaxies.
      • Barred spiral galaxies.
      • Lenticular galaxies.
      • Elliptical galaxies.
      • Ring galaxies.
      • Irregular galaxies.
      .
    • galaxies by size
      • Giant diffuse galaxies.
      • Giant ellipticals.
      • Dwarf galaxies.
      .
    • Active galaxies
      • quasars
        • Blazars.
        .
      • radio galaxies.
      • Seyfert galaxies.
      • Starburst galaxies.
      .
    • Dark galaxies.
    .
  • Galaxy clusters.
  • Galaxy cluster clouds.
  • superclusters.
  • Filaments / Voids.
  • Circumstellar matter .
  • interstellar medium.
  • nebulae
    • Emission nebulae
      • Planetary nebulae.
      • Supernova remnants.
      • Plerions.
      • H II regions.
      .
    • Reflection nebulae.
    • Dark nebulae
      • Molecular clouds.
      • Bok globules.
      • Proplyds.
      .
    • H I regions.
    .
  • Intergalactic medium.
  • cosmic microwave background radiation.
  • Dark matter
    • MACHOs.
    • WIMPs.
    .
  • Hypothetical
    • Cosmic string.
    • Domain wall.
    .



Go To Print Article  


the web this site
 | GNU License | Contact | Copyright | WebMaster | Terms | Disclaimer | Top Of Page. |