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Cassini's Best View of Titan Yet.


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smog-enshrouded Titan.
smog-enshrouded Titan.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has turned its gaze on smog-covered Titan again, delivering its best picture yet of Saturn's largest moon. This image was taken on June 14, 2004 when the spacecraft was 10.4 million km (6.5 million miles) away; it's three times as much resolution as the previous image of Titan released a few weeks ago. Cassini took the picture using a special filter designed to see through Titan's atmospheric haze of methane to the surface below.

The Cassini spacecraft has beamed back a new, more detailed image of smog-enshrouded Titan.

This view represents an improvement in resolution of nearly a factor of three over the previous Cassini image release about Titan. The observed brightness variations are real on scales of a hundred kilometers or less.

The image was obtained in the near-infrared (centered at 938 nanometers) through a polarizing filter. The combination was designed to reduce the obscuration by atmospheric haze. The haze is more transparant at 938 nm than it is at shorter wavelengths and light of 938 nm wavelength is not absorbed by methane gas in Titan's atmosphere. light at this wavelength consequently samples the surface, and the polarizer blocks out light scattered mainly by the haze. This is similar to the way a polarizer, put on the front of a lens of a hand-held camera, makes distant objects more clear on the Earth.

The superimposed coordinate system grid in the accompanying image at right illustrates the geographical regions of the Moon that are illuminated and visible, as well as the orientation of Titan – north is up and rotated 25 degrees to the left. The yellow curve marks the position of the boundary between day and night on Titan.

This image shows about one quarter of Titan's surface, from 0 to 70 degrees West longitude, and just barely overlaps part of the surface shown in the previous Titan image release. Most of the visible surface in this image has not yet been shown in any Cassini image release.

The image was obtained with the narrow angle camera on June 14, 2004, at a phase, or Sun-Titan-spacecraft, angle of 61 degrees and at a distance of 10.4 million kilometers (6.5 million miles) from Titan. The image scale is 62 kilometers (39 miles) per pixel. The image was magnified by a factor of two using a linear interpolation scheme. No further processing to remove the effects of the overlying atmosphere has been performed.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini-Huygens mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The imaging team is based at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission, visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and the Cassini imaging team home page, http://ciclops.org.




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